Part Two: How To Include Carbs Into Your Diet.

First off, I hope everyone had a great thanksgiving. While you all know I endorse a Paleo lifestyle, I will admit that I myself ate my fair share of carbs last Thursday—and lived to tell the tale. Hopefully my last newsletter helped you to understand important role carbohydrates play in both physical and mental health. But an informed decision to include this macronutrient into your balanced diet is only the first step. Now, the questions you're probably asking are: which carbs are the healthiest? How can I incorporate them into my diet with maximum results? And finally, how do I know what exactly what my carb-intake should be? This last question is perhaps the most important, as a lot of people tend to mentally misconstrue how much of a certain food group they are ingesting. Do you know what are the recommended daily allotments of carbohydrates for someone of your age and weight? Have you ever kept track of the grams or percentage of calories you are receiving from carbs? 

As I explained in part-1 of this 2-part series on carbohydrates, something as basic as carb-intake can have an effect on health conditions from depression and lethargy to digestive upset and athletic performance. Keeping a balanced diet is undeniably one of our most valuable roots to good health. So, I have written the following newsletter to expose just which carbohydrate-containing foods offer the most benefits, like increased energy, healthier sleep patterns, etc., and I have included an easy process to help you calculate your own individual, optimum carb-intake based on health conditions, exercise level, age, weight and other factors, so that you can all get the most health benefits out of your diet.

If you’ve been shying away from carbohydrates until now, I’m guessing that’s because you think they make you gain weight. And that’s true—in some cases. If you generally eat very low amounts of carbs but binge on pizza or bread every once in a while, you will probably find that these slip-ups do add on some pounds. Don’t blame carbohydrates as a whole though; blame the refined and processed carbs that constitute America’s favorite junk foods. Carbs must be incorporated into a diet strategically and thoughtfully in order to avoid the harmful side effects that can result from ingesting certain refined carbs, like sugar and white flour. Following are some charts of diet-friendly foods and the amount of carbs (in grams) they contain. If you want to know more about which carb-containing foods to keep and which to toss, take a look at the November newsletter (click here). 

The moral of the story is that, when you’re choosing which carbohydrates to eat, please choose carefully; i.e. go for fruit, not chips. 

Knowing which carbs to eat is only half the work though. The next step is figuring out how much of your daily calories should come from carbohydrates—something that will ultimately be a result of personal factors and preferences. The following information is meant to help you customize your own diet in a way that can have you feeling your best; it just takes a little diligence and patience.

Step 1 is to assess what percentage of carbs will work best with your life-style and weight goals. First, look at any diseases or health conditions you may be suffering from. For example, if you have diabetes or small intestinal bacteria overgrowth, you are going to want to start off in the low-carb category. If you have adrenal fatigue, are breastfeeding, or are a moderate to heavy exerciser, you’ll probably want to start at a moderate carb level. There are many other conditions that can affect how well your body receives carbs, so please be sure to assess your overall health when deciding what amount of carbs might work best for you. If you have multiple conditions that require opposite amounts of carbs, you should consider working personally with a practitioner. 

If you don’t have a condition that places you in a particular spot on the carb-intake spectrum, the best place to start is with a moderate carb diet. I suggest keeping a food diary in order to keep track of any symptom regression/improvement. Ultimately, the best indicator of carb-intake is how you feel, e.g. good, bloated, weak, etc.. Based on this diary, you can experiment by increasing and decreasing your carb percentage until you find a level that benefits you the most.

Step 2 is to figure out how many calories you should be eating each day from carbohydrates. If you know what your daily calorie-intake should be, simply multiply it by your target-percentage of carbohydrates. The following chart details what percentages constitute which carb-levels (low, moderate, high), as well as which populations would benefit most from each level:

 If you are unsure how many calories you should be consuming each day, you may want to search the web for an online calorie calculator. Otherwise, 2000 is a reasonable number to start with. So if you want 20% of your calories to come from carbs, multiply .20 x 2000 = 400. This is the number of calories you should be getting each day from carbohydrates. If you don’t feel like counting calories you can divide this number by 4 to figure out how many grams of carbohydrates you should be eating each day. 400 / 4 = 100g of carbs a day. Based on the first few charts, we see this goal can be met by eating a banana and an apple between meals, ½ a head of romaine lettuce in a salad for lunch, and a sweet potato with dinner, for example. 

If this process sounds a little too mathematical to you, you can also use the basic rule of thirds, which requires your plate to be 1/3 protein, 1/3 starch, and 1/3 low-carb vegetables and tubers. Following this rule will put you somewhere near the moderate-carb level.

I would like to stress that the diet calculation process as a whole is somewhat imprecise and for most, it will take some experimenting. Start in a moderate position unless you have one of the aforementioned health conditions, see how you feel, and adjust your carb-intake from there. My final advice is to please give each stage of your experimenting a fair amount time for your body to acclimate. If you eat only 10%-15% of calories from carbohydrates and you start feeling sluggish, have a harder time shedding that last pound or two of fat, or aren’t sleeping as well, you might need to consider slightly raising your carb-level. If you’re eating 30% or more of calories from carbs and you notice weight gain or digestive upset, you should consider a moderate or low-carb diet.

Remember: patience is key. There’s no miracle diet or one-size-fits-all approach. But, if you do give your diet the time and attention it deserves, the results should be well worth it.

Please call 734-726-0153 to schedule a free consultation and evaluation. At Digestive Health Ann Arbor we are known for providing professional and compassionate care. We strive to guide people towards a comprehensive and holistic healing strategy. Restoring your body to health will restore the quality of your life.

Your health is a choice.

For most people, health is a choice.

Current testing for cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin is incomplete.

They do not do a very good job of predicting your risk for heart disease, diabetes or hypertension.

Most doctors are not giving you the information you need to make the best health choices possible.

If you are:

·         A man over 45 or a woman over 55

·         Feeling tired and fatigues

·         Challenged to lose weight

·         Taking a statin (like: Cestor, Lipitor, Zocor a drug to manage glucose & Insulin

If you have:

·         Type II Diabetes or are Insulin Resistant

·         Coronary Heart Disease

·         Inflammation anywhere in your body

·         High cholesterol & triglycerides

·         Low Thyroid function

·         Hypertension

If you are suffering from any of these, you need to take the first step towards wellness now.

Our wellness program starts with a free evaluation and consultation to help you take the steps needed to be healthy. We offer a complete approach to wellness.

·         We use state of the art testing.

·         We deliver a comprehensive metabolic profile

·         We help with creating a sustainable eating lifestyle designed for your specific needs

·         We provide on-going nutritional, clinical and lifestyle support

·         We can get you any needed supplements

Most importantly your health insurance will cover the cost of all the needed testing.

Call today to schedule your free initial consultation and evaluation to start your journey of health and wellness.

Remember, your health insurance will cover the entire cost of the complete metabolic profile.

(It does not matter what your current deductible is)

Other tests included in the metabolic profile include:

·         Thyroid function(more complete then standard medical testing for thyroid health)

·         Adrenal health (including: cortisol & DHEA)

·         All reproductive hormones (including: estrogen, progesterone, prolactin &  testosterone)

·         B12 & folate

·         Liver function

·         Kidney Function

·         Iron metabolism

·         PSA

·         Vitamin D3

In addition to an extremely comprehensive test for cholesterol and triglycerides (VAP test) some of the other tests that are included in our metabolic profile include:

C-Reactive Protein-hs
High sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP) is a nonspecific inflammatory marker produced by the liver in response to inflammatory adipocytokines and macrophages. It is a strong and independent risk marker for primary and secondary CHD events, sudden death, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Elevation of hsCRP is also associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome.

LpPLA2/PLAC®

Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 (LpPLA2) is an enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of oxidized phospholipase on LDL. It is a specific marker for vascular inflammation and is produced in unstable atherosclerotic plaque. Elevated levels indicate a 2 fold increase risk for CVD events and ischemic stroke.

GlycoMark®
GlycoMark measures I,5 anhydroglucitol (1,5 – AG). It is a nonmetabolized monosaccharide present in small amounts in most foods. I,5 – AG reflects peak glucose levels over 1-2 weeks (short term glucose control). These peaks , not detected by A1C, are associated with the cardiovascular complications of diabetes. 1,5 – AG levels assist in monitoring drug efficacy and treatment alterations including diet and exercise regimens in patients with A1C's at or near goal.

Homocysteine
Homocysteine is an amino acid associated with methionine metabolism.
Homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for primary and secondary CHD events, CHD death, stroke and all cause mortality. Each increase of 5 umol/L in homocysteine level increases the risk of CHD events by approximately 20%, independent of traditional risk factors.

Cystatin C
Cystatin C is an enzyme mainly used as a biomarker of renal function. Unlike creatinine, cystatin C is capable of detecting mild decreases in GFR and affected only minimally by age, muscle mass, gender and race. It is also a prognostic marker of CV events, CHF, CVA, PAD, metabolic syndrome and all cause mortality even in the absence of established renal disease.

GGT
Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) is an enzyme catalyst in the degradation of glutathione, the major antioxidant in the body. GGT is a sensitive proatherogenic, prognostic biomarker for oxidative stress and subclinical atherosclerosis, along with being an independent predictor of metabolic syndrome. Elevated levels are associated with hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, fatty liver and an increase in all cause mortality and morbidity.

NTproBNP
N-terminal prohormone BNP (NTproBNP) is a hormone secreted mainly from cardiac monocytes in response to cardiac stress. It is a sensitive biomarker that has powerful prognostic value for detection of subclinical, unsuspected cardiac dysfunction. NTproBNP is an independent predictor of cardiac events and all cause mortality.

Uric Acid
Uric acid is the degradation product of purine metabolism. Uric acid elevations are associated with gout, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, CVD, CHF, CVA, dementia, preeclampsia, kidney disease, leukemia and oxidative stress. For every 1 mg/dL increase in serum uric acid, there is a 41% excess risk for mortality. Elevated serum uric acid levels in patients with hypertension are associated with a 3-5 fold increased risk of CAD or CVA.

Vitamin D
Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin made by ultraviolet light activity on exposed skin. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a significant graded increased risk for primary and secondary CAD events, PAD, CVA, diabetes and all cause mortality. The Framingham Offspring Study revealed that there was a 1.8X increased risk of CV events when 25(OH) vitamin D levels were < 10 ng/ml. Myalgias from statin therapy may be associated with low vitamin D levels.

For more information about this test, please visit http://www.atherotech.com/vapcholtest/.

Please call 734-726-0153 to schedule a free consultation and evaluation. At Digestive Health Ann Arbor we are known for providing professional and compassionate care. We strive to guide people towards a comprehensive and holistic healing strategy. Restoring your body to health will restore the quality of your life.

Your Metabolic Wellness

For most people health is a choice.

Current testing for cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin are incomplete.

They do not actually do a very good job of predicting your risk for heart disease, diabetes or hypertension

Most doctors are not giving you the information you need to make the best health choices possible!

If you are at risk for:

  • Type II Diabetes or are Insulin Resistant
  • Coronary Heart Disease
  • Have inflammation anywhere in your body
  • High cholesterol & triglycerides
  • Having a hard time loosing weight
  • Low Thyroid function
  • Hypertension
  • Taking a statin (like: Cestor, Lipitor, Zocor a drug to manage glucose & Insulin
  • Family history of premature coronary heart disease
  • A man over 45 or a woman over 55

You need to take the first step towards wellness.

Our wellness program starts with a free evaluation & consultation to help you take the first steps towards being healthy. We offer a complete approach to wellness.

  • We use state of the art testing.
  • A comprehensive metabolic profile
  • Help with creating a sustainable eating lifestyle designed for your specific needs
  • On going nutritional, clinical and life style support
  • Needed supplements

 

Most importantly your health insurance will cover the cost of all the needed testing.

Call today to schedule your free initial consultation and evaluation and start your journey of health and wellness.

Remember, your health insurance will cover the entire cost of the complete metabolic profile.

(It does not matter what your current deductible is)

In addition to an extremely comprehensive test for cholesterol and triglycerides (VAP test) some of the other tests that are included in our metabolic profile include:

C-Reactive Protein-hs
High sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP) is a nonspecific inflammatory marker produced by the liver in response to inflammatory adipocytokines and macrophages. It is a strong and independent risk marker for primary and secondary CHD events, sudden death, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Elevation of hsCRP is also associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome.

LpPLA2/PLAC®

Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 (LpPLA2) is an enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of oxidized phospholipase on LDL. It is a specific marker for vascular inflammation and is produced in unstable atherosclerotic plaque. Elevated levels indicate a 2 fold increase risk for CVD events and ischemic stroke.

GlycoMark®
GlycoMark measures I,5 anhydroglucitol (1,5 – AG). It is a nonmetabolized monosaccharide present in small amounts in most foods. I,5 – AG reflects peak glucose levels over 1-2 weeks (short term glucose control). These peaks , not detected by A1C, are associated with the cardiovascular complications of diabetes. 1,5 – AG levels assist in monitoring drug efficacy and treatment alterations including diet and exercise regimens in patients with A1C's at or near goal.

Homocysteine
Homocysteine is an amino acid associated with methionine metabolism.
Homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for primary and secondary CHD events, CHD death, stroke and all cause mortality. Each increase of 5 umol/L in homocysteine level increases the risk of CHD events by approximately 20%, independent of traditional risk factors.

Cystatin C
Cystatin C is an enzyme mainly used as a biomarker of renal function. Unlike creatinine, cystatin C is capable of detecting mild decreases in GFR and affected only minimally by age, muscle mass, gender and race. It is also a prognostic marker of CV events, CHF, CVA, PAD, metabolic syndrome and all cause mortality even in the absence of established renal disease.

GGT
Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) is an enzyme catalyst in the degradation of glutathione, the major antioxidant in the body. GGT is a sensitive proatherogenic, prognostic biomarker for oxidative stress and subclinical atherosclerosis, along with being an independent predictor of metabolic syndrome. Elevated levels are associated with hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, fatty liver and an increase in all cause mortality and morbidity.

NTproBNP
N-terminal prohormone BNP (NTproBNP) is a hormone secreted mainly from cardiac monocytes in response to cardiac stress. It is a sensitive biomarker that has powerful prognostic value for detection of subclinical, unsuspected cardiac dysfunction. NTproBNP is an independent predictor of cardiac events and all cause mortality.

Uric Acid
Uric acid is the degradation product of purine metabolism. Uric acid elevations are associated with gout, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, CVD, CHF, CVA, dementia, preeclampsia, kidney disease, leukemia and oxidative stress. For every 1 mg/dL increase in serum uric acid, there is a 41% excess risk for mortality. Elevated serum uric acid levels in patients with hypertension are associated with a 3-5 fold increased risk of CAD or CVA.

Vitamin D
Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin made by ultraviolet light activity on exposed skin. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a significant graded increased risk for primary and secondary CAD events, PAD, CVA, diabetes and all cause mortality. The Framingham Offspring Study revealed that there was a 1.8X increased risk of CV events when 25(OH) vitamin D levels were < 10 ng/ml. Myalgias from statin therapy may be associated with low vitamin D levels.

Other tests included in the metabolic profile include:

  • Thyroid function  (more complete then standard medical testing for thyroid health)
  • Adrenal health (including: cortisol & DHEA)
  • All reproductive hormones (including: estrogen, progesterone, prolactin &  testosterone)
  • B12 & folate
  • Liver function
  • Kidney Function
  • Iron metabolism
  • PSA

Please call 734-726-0153 to schedule a free consultation and evaluation. At Digestive Health Ann Arbor we are known for providing professional and compassionate care. We strive to guide people towards a comprehensive and holistic healing strategy. Restoring your body to health will restore the quality of your life.